Singapore is a thriving monetary center of multinational service not only to its home economy, it also serves the whole Asian-Pacific area. Things like a prudent business and policymaking environment, favorable legislative and fiscal practices, a solid reputation for honesty, and rigorous efforts to combat corruption and AML have all played a part in Singapore’s position as an IFC. Nowadays, there are some 117 expatriate banks and 6 local branches working in Singapore. In this article we will look at just a few Singapore banks, for more, go to https://sgbanks.com/banks.

What do Singapore banks offer us?

Singapore has repeatedly confirmed its position as a top modern financial center with a well-developed and reliable financial sector. Individual banks like UBS, Bank of Singapore, Credit Suisse, Citigroup and Standard Chartered are just a few who offer worldwide asset services, advisory services for property and lifestyle management, valuation strategies along with income tax and property management, asset defense and credit services. Now let’s explore them in more detail.

UBS Bank – is the Swiss bank that provides the following services in Singapore: Private Banking, Asset Management, Wealth Planning, Wealth Management, Investment Banking, Financial Intermediation, Access to International Markets and more.

Bank of Singapore – is the subsidiary bank of Singapore’s leading bank OCBC.Bank of Singapore provides asset creation and preservation services, credit solutions – mortgage and individual financing options, holistic wealth planning and digital services.

CITIBANK – is a wholly owned subsidiary of US-based CITIGROUP, the world’s largest financial institution serving more than 200 million customer accounts in more than 160 countries and jurisdictions.

Standard Chartered Bank – SCB is currently one of only 3 banks in Hong Kong authorized to produce monetary bills. The bank’s equities are listed on the London and Hong Kong stock exchanges. It employs more than 30,000 people and has more than 500 offices in 50 world markets.

Adam Zellner